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David A. Romero

Research area:

Computational Sustainability, Wind energy, Distributed Generation, Simulation-based Design Optimization

Degree: Postdoctoral Researcher

Department: Mechanical & Industrial Engineering

Supervisor: Professor Cristina Amon

Details:

Optimization Methods in Wind Energy ApplicationsIn recent years, there has been a growing interest on sustainable energy resources, such as solar, geothermal, wave, and wind energy. The renewable energy sector’s share of the energy supply is expected to grow to 18.6% by 2030. Moreover, the International Energy Agency (IEA) predicts that wind energy will have a 12% share of the global energy supply by 2050. To reach this target, the wind energy production capacity will have to increase at an average rate of 47 GW/year, resulting in massive investments and a dynamic, growing market for wind-related technology and services. The overall vision for our research program is to develop a state-of-the-art methodology for optimal design of wind farms, with simultaneous consideration of power generation, environmental impact with respect to noise, and life-cycle cost of the wind farm, including its decommissioning. This goal will be achieved by joining efforts with our industrial partner, a global leader in the energy infrastructure sector with extensive expertise and experience in the design, construction and commissioning of wind farms. Our work will integrate our team expertise in modeling and optimization, as well as our industrial partner's technical expertise in the multiple disciplines involved in the design problem: electrical, mechanical, civil, environmental and economics. We will study the optimal wind farm layout problem from the theoretical and computational perspectives to fully-characterize the problem and to develop efficient algorithms for its solution. In recent years, there has been a growing interest on sustainable energy resources, such as solar, geothermal, wave, and wind energy. The renewable energy sector’s share of the energy supply is expected to grow to 18.6% by 2030. Moreover, the International Energy Agency (IEA) predicts that wind energy will have a 12% share of the global energy supply by 2050. To reach this target, the wind energy production capacity will have to increase at an average rate of 47 GW/year, resulting in massive investments and a dynamic, growing market for wind-related technology and services. The overall vision for our research program is to develop a state-of-the-art methodology for optimal design of wind farms, with simultaneous consideration of power generation, environmental impact with respect to noise, and life-cycle cost of the wind farm, including its decommissioning. This goal will be achieved by joining efforts with our industrial partner, a global leader in the energy infrastructure sector with extensive expertise and experience in the design, construction and commissioning of wind farms. Our work will integrate our team expertise in modeling and optimization, as well as our industrial partner's technical expertise in the multiple disciplines involved in the design problem: electrical, mechanical, civil, environmental and economics. We will study the optimal wind farm layout problem from the theoretical and computational perspectives to fully-characterize the problem and to develop efficient algorithms for its solution.

Contact Information

d.romero@utoronto.ca |

LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/davidromerot

https://www.mie.utoronto.ca/labs/atoms/