Posts Tagged: graduate courses

MSE courses

MMS1023 Special Topics in Materials Science II: Electron Transport in Quantum Nanostructures

The course will provide an introduction to the primary transport mechanisms in quantized semiconductor nanostructures. This includes tunneling, Coulomb blockade, ballistic and wavelike transport. Students will also be introduced to fabrication methodologies, and the focus will be on low dimensional systems – particularly, quantum dots and wires.

MSE 558 Nanotechnology in Alternate Energy Systems

The unique surface properties and the ability to surface engineer nanocrystalline structures in devices renders nanocrystalline materials to be ideal candidates for use in structural materials, corrosion coatings, and catalysts in energy conversion devices such as electrolysers, energy storage media and fuel cells. These new devices are poised to have major impacts on power generation utilities, the automotive sector, and society at large. The differences in observed electrochemical behavior between amorphous, nanocrystalline and polycrystalline solid materials will be discussed in terms of their surface structure and surface chemistry. A group design project competition, sponsored by the Ontario Centre of Excellence in Energy, allows students from various disciplines to work together to formulate a proposal including technical, economic, and environmental solutions to a problem.

MSE 561 Engineered Ceramics

The unique combinations of physical, electrical, magnetic, and thermomechanical properties exhibited by advanced technical ceramics has led to a wide range of applications including automobile exhaust sensors and fuel cells, high speed cutting tool inserts and ball bearings, thermal barrier coating for turbine engines and surgical implants. This course examines the crystal and defect structures which determine the electrical and mass transport behaviour and the effects of microstructure on optical, magnetic, dielectric, and thermomechanical properties. The influence of these structure-property relations on the performance of ceramic materials in specific applications such as sensors, solid oxide fuel cells, magnets, and structural components is explored.

MSE504 Extractive Metallurgy

Technologies and unit operations used in the production of light metals, non-ferrous and ferrous metals will be presented and analyzed. Emphasis will be placed on analyzing overall flowsheets used by selected companies for the purpose of determining how overall process efficiency can be improved and the environmental impact reduced. Methods and technologies used for metals recycling will also be discussed. Examples will be given from the steel, copper, nickel, zinc, aluminum and magnesium industries. The students will be exposed to a series of actual industrial case studies.


Joint courses

JEI1901   Technology, Society, and the Environment

This course develops a conceptual framework for understanding technology-society-biosphere interactions and applies this to the development of preventive approaches for the engineering, management and regulation of modern technology in order to reduce burden imposed on society and the environment. Topics include: society as a cultural system; industrialization as a process that simultaneously transforms technology, society and the biosphere; technology as knowledge; the modern corporation; underdevelopment and technology transfer; and sustainable development. Exclusion: APS103H.

JEI1902   Technology, Society, and the Environment II

This course continues the development of the conceptual framework for understanding technology-society-biosphere interactions with the advent of high technology in general and computer-based technologies in particular. Their influence on knowledge and expertise, technology and society will be examined with applications to preventive engineering. Topics include: the rationalization of intellectual work; technology as life-milieu, social force and system; and, feedback in the technological system and its response to values.

JEI1902   Technology, Society, and the Environment II

This course continues the development of the conceptual framework for understanding technology-society-biosphere interactions with the advent of high technology in general and computer-based technologies in particular. Their influence on knowledge and expertise, technology and society will be examined with applications to preventive engineering. Topics include: the rationalization of intellectual work; technology as life-milieu, social force and system; and, feedback in the technological system and its response to values.

JPG 1404   Issues in global warming

This course presents a comprehensive overview of the greenhouse gas/global warming issue, its relationship to other atmospheric environmental problems, and policy options at the local to international scale.

JPG 1406   Energy supply and use

 

JPG 1407   Efficient Use of Energy

The course examines the options available for dramatically reducing our use of primary energy with no reduction in meaningful energy services, through more efficient use of energy at the scale of energy-using devices and of entire energy systems. Topics covered include generation of electricity from fossil fuels and energy use in buildings, transportation, industry, and agriculture. Each topic will cover (i) the underlying physical principles that determine the potential of and the limits to energy efficiency improvements, (ii) the difference in potential savings when focusing on individual energy using devices rather than entire energy-using systems, (iii) examples of efficiency improvements that have been achieved in practice in various countries around the world, and (iv) the cost and financing of energy efficiency improvements. As well, the role of the so-called rebound effect in eroding the energy-saving benefit of efficiency improvements will be discussed.

JPG 1408   Carbon-Free Energy

The course examines the options available for providing energy from carbon-free energy sources:
solar, wind, biomass, hydro, oceanic, and geothermal energy, as well as through sequestration of
carbon from fossil fuel sources. The hydrogen economy is also discussed. For each carbon-free
energy source, the physical principles, physical or biophysical limits, efficiencies, and other
constraining factors are discussed, as well as examples of current applications, current and
projected future costs, and possible future scenarios. The course concludes by combining the
main conclusions from JPG 1407F concerning the prospects for reducing energy demand through
improved energy efficiency, with the conclusions drawn in this course concerning the feasibility
of large-scale carbon-free energy, to generate scenarios of future greenhouse gas emissions,
showing the range of possible consequences for global mean temperature, sea level rise, and
ocean acidification.


ECE courses

ECE 1041 Numerical Solution of Field Problems

Introduction to the general method of moments. Numerical solution of the electrostatic capacitance problem and the wire antenna problem by Harrington´s moment method. Finite element and finite difference solution of Laplace´s, Poisson´s and Helmholtz´s equations. Application to bounded electrostatic, magnetostatic and homogeneous waveguide and cavity problems. Eddy current and skin effect problems; finite element solution of the diffusion equation in one and two dimensions. Relationship between field and circuit quantities. This course requires a basic background in computer programming.

ECE 1042 High-Voltage Engineering

An introductory course on high voltage engineering principles and techniques. Computational methods related to quasi-stationary electric fields in complex geometries. Generation and measurement of basic voltage forms employed in high voltage engineering, and their relevance to high voltage design. This course requires a basic background in fields and waves and circuit theory.

ECE 1049 Special Topics in Power Devices and Systems

Power Networks

ECE 1055 Dynamics of HVdc/ac Transmission Systems

General aspects of high voltage ac/dc systems, principles of HVdc systems, HVdc control, harmonics and filters. Small-signal dynamics of HVdc/ac systems and eigen analysis, subsynchronous oscillations, interarea oscillations, harmonic instability. Large-signal dynamics in HVdc/ac systems. Introduction to the EMTP and the EMTDC software packages for the analysis and design of HVdc/ac systems. Introduction to multi-terminal HVdc systems. A basic background in power system analysis is strongly recommended.

ECE 1059 Special Topics in Power Systems: Overvoltages and Insulation Co-ordination

 

ECE 1063 Application of Power Devices

Safe operating requirements for GTO´s, SCR´s BIPOLAR, MOSFET, IGBT, cascode switches power diodes, high voltage tubes and surge arrestors. Base drive circuits for power devices. Protection of power devices. Illustrative design process for the selection and protection of power devices. This course requires a basic background in circuit theory and electronic circuits.

ECE 1065 Space Vector Theory & Control

The course presents the general theory of dynamic modelling and control of the voltage source converter using space vectors. Applications include custom power controllers, FACTS (flexible AC Transmission Systems) controllers, VSC based HVDC systems and motor drives. Co-ordinate transforms necessary for the analysis of these devices are presented: space vectors, synchronous reference frame quantities, complex Fourier components and their relations. Converter controls are developed using both continuous time and discrete time space vector control concepts. In addition, state space modelling methods are employed for the study of interactions between a dc/ac converter and the network. The course typically includes an extensive laboratory component. Prerequisite: ECE 533 or equivalent, or instructor approval.

ECE 1066 Design of High-Frequency Switch-Mode Power Supplies I (Advanced Control Techniques)

Design, analysis, and practical implementation of advanced controllers for high-frequency switch-mode power supplies (SMPS) are covered. The topics include: continuous and discrete time modeling of switching converters; current-program mode control, power factor correction rectifiers; practical implementation of analog and digital controllers. The course also has a laboratory portion, where a high-frequency switching converter and its controller are designed and fabricated.

ECE 1067 Switch-Mode Power Supplies (SMPS)

This course covers the design and analysis of switch-mode power supplies used in virtually all electronic devices, including small mobile applications, computers, medical devices, consumer electronics, motor drives, electric vehicles, and power systems. Topics to be covered include: switch-mode power supplies topologies; analysis of the steady-state operation; components; modeling and control of switch-mode power supplies; practical control loop implementation.

ECE 1068 Introduction to Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC)

This course provides a fundamental understanding of the means by which electromagnetic interference arises. Techniques to reduce, overcome, or to protect sensitive electronic equipment from electromagnetic interference are covered. Course content: source of noise, modes of noise coupling, preventative measures, transmitters and receivers, grounding, surge protection. The course concludes with a case study. This course requires a basic background in circuit theory, fields and waves, and some knowledge in power electronics.

ECE 1072 AC Drive System Dynamics

Analysis of dynamics of ac drive systems supplied by variable voltage and frequency converters: machine and converter modeling for ac drives, field oriented ac machine controls, observers for stator flux and rotor flux, closed loop torque control. Synthesis of closed loop control systems for torque, current and position applying linear and nonlinear control theory, and dynamic models of ac machines. The course includes assignments to study drive systems by computer simulation (Personal Computers) using the drive simulation package ISIPC developed at the University of Toronto, or other packages familiar to the students. It is recommended that students take ECE 533H. This course requires a basic background in controls and electric machines.

ECE 1081 Application of the Finite Element Method to Field Problems

The objective is to provide students having a basic knowledge of electromagnetic field theory and numerical analysis with hands-on experience in applying the finite element method to solve field problems. The subject material will be selected from the following: (1) Introduction to the finite element method; application to linear, two-dimensional boundary value problems in electrostatics and magnetostatics. (2) Finite element solution of the nonlinear magnetostatic problem. (3) Vector finite element formulations; eigenvalue problems; spurious solutions; edge elements. (4) Finite element solution of eddy current and skin effect problems; the integrodifferential formulation. (5) Finite element formulation of coupled problems. (6) Maxwell stress tensor and electromagnetic forces. (7) Review of recent developments in finite element methods for 2D and 3D electromagnetic field problems.

ECE 1082 Mathematics for Advanced Electromagnetics

The understanding of numerous methods of analysis used in advanced electromagnetics depends on in-depth knowledge of complex variables, linear analysis, the Dirac delta function, Sturm-Liouville operator theory and boundary value problems, Green´s functions, spectral representations, and others. The course material comprises linear analysis leading to the introduction of the method of moments; electromagnetic boundary value problems of the Sturm-Liouville type in one-, two- and three-dimensions; modal expansion methods; Green´s function methods; mathematical representation of electromagnetic voltage and current sources. The course belongs sufficiently in the class of applied mathematics courses to also attract graduate students from outside the Power Group.

ECE 1083 Harmonic Balance and the Finite Element Method

The course will start with an explanation of harmonic balance theory and a description of its use for the analysis of nonlinear circuits in general. This will be followed by a brief review of nonlinear magnetic circuits and the classical finite element method for magnetostatic field problems. Attention will then be focused on the implementation and application of the harmonic balance finite element method. Examples found in the literature will be used to illustrate the usefulness of this steady state nonlinear circuit analysis technique.

ECE 1089 Special Topics in Electromagnetics: Practical Application of Finite Element Method

 

ECE 533 Power Electronics

Switched mode power supply design for telecommunication computer and information applications; steady state analysis, component ratings, EMC regulatory issues, control loop modelling and control loop design. Prerequisites: ECE 315 or ECE 359 (these prerequisites are only for undergraduate students)

ECE1057 Static Power Converters I—Principles of Operation and Applications

Principles of operation of AC-DC, DC-AC and direct AC-AC power converters, applications of static converters for power transmission: (i) point-to-point and back-to-back HVDC, (ii) wind power conversion system, and (iii) micro-turbine system, applications of static converters for compensation: (i) series compensation, (ii) shunt compensation, (iii) and hybrid compensation. Distributed generation/storage and micro-grid, impact of static converters on transient stability.

ECE1057 Static Power Converters I—Principles of Operation and Applications

Principles of operation of AC-DC, DC-AC and direct AC-AC power converters, applications of static converters for power transmission: (i) point-to-point and back-to-back HVDC, (ii) wind power conversion system, and (iii) micro-turbine system, applications of static converters for compensation: (i) series compensation, (ii) shunt compensation, (iii) and hybrid compensation. Distributed generation/storage and micro-grid, impact of static converters on transient stability.

ECE1058 Static Power Converters II—Dynamics and Control

Small-Signal models of AC-DC, DC-AC and AC-AC converter systems, HVDC controls, controls of wind power conversion system, controls of micro-turbine system, controls of series-compensator, controls of shunt-compensator, controls of hybrid-compensator, controls of distributed generation/storage and dynamics of micro-grid, islanding detection and issues, small-signal modeling and analysis of large electric power systems.

ECE1084 Design of Advanced High-Efficiency Switched Mode Power Supplies

This course is focused on the design and implementation of high-efficiency switched mode power supplies (SMPS). The primary emphasis is on converter efficiency optimization and related control techniques, from the system down to the transistor level. A significant portion of the course is dedicated to integrated (on-chip) SMPS, including high-frequency power-stage design, loss calculations, inductor selection, light-load optimization techniques (PFM/pulse skip), adaptive dead-time control, active gate-charge management, EMI issues, frequency scaling, layout issues, low-voltage power semiconductors. segmented power-stages, self-protection circuits, senSing techniques, system-level issues, and practical SMPS applications.

ECE1084 Design of Advanced High-Efficiency Switched Mode Power Supplies

This course is focused on the design and implementation of high-efficiency switched mode power supplies (SMPS). The primary emphasis is on converter efficiency optimization and related control techniques, from the system down to the transistor level. A significant portion of the course is dedicated to integrated (on-chip) SMPS, including high-frequency power-stage design, loss calculations, inductor selection, light-load optimization techniques (PFM/pulse skip), adaptive dead-time control, active gate-charge management, EMI issues, frequency scaling, layout issues, low-voltage power semiconductors. segmented power-stages, self-protection circuits, senSing techniques, system-level issues, and practical SMPS applications.

ECE1085 Power System Optimization

Explore techniques for the optimization of power system operations, including the following topics: state estimation, power system security, economic dispatch, power markets, and unit commitment.

ECE510 Introduction to Lighting Systems

An introduction to the physics of lighting systems (e.g. plasma physics, radiation spectrum, physics of light-emitting diodes) and the corresponding power electronic driver circuits (ballasts). The operating principles and the science behind different types of lamps are covered. These include incandescent, fluorescent, low and high pressure sodium, mercury, metal halide lamps and LED lighting systems. The designs and technical challenges of the electronic ballasts for each type of lighting source are discussed. Emphasis is given to issues related to lighting regulations, layout, delivery, efficiency and control. In addition, the economic and environmental assessment of current lighting systems is also addressed.


CIV courses

CIV1307 Evaluating the Sustainability of Engineering Activities

Engineers in the 21st Century need to incorporate economic, environmental and sustainability objectives into their work. In comparing two projects/designs it is not always apparent which one has better lifetime performance with regard to these goals. The course presents a systems evaluation framework, including environmental, economic and policy analyses methods for evaluating engineering activities. Specific topics include life cycle assessment; materials accounting; green engineering; risk assessment and management; benefit cost and cost effectiveness analyses; and uncertainty analysis. We examine these methods and apply them to current engineering design issues, including those related to global climate change, alternative-fueled vehicles, water and wastewater treatment, energy issues, and air pollution.


CHM courses

CHM1401 Transport and Fate of Chemical Species in the Environment

Introduction to the physical environment. Fundamentals of chemical kinetics. Gas-phase reactions. Reactions in the environment. Reactions in the environment. Reactions in the environment. Chemicalthermodynamics. Photochemistry. Environmental influences on chemistry. Phase partitioning. Phase partitioning. Sorption of organic contaminants to soils and sediments. NMR or OM characterization.

CHM1458 Topics in Reaction Kinetics I

CHM1464 Topics in Statistical Mechanics

 

CHM1479 Thermodynamics

The course will begin with a review of the second law of thermodynamics, and a comparison of formulations of the second law. Several applications of thermodynamics will be considered, such as phase transitions and critical phenomena, thermodynamics of surfaces and non-equilibrium thermodynamics.


CHE courses

CHE 1118 Industrial Catalysis

The course covers adsorption, the nature of the catalyst surface, kinetics of catalytic reactions, catalyst selection and preparation, deactivation and poisoning, and specific catalytic reactions. The types of reactions and the examples considered will depend to some extent on the particular interests of those selecting the course but will include, in any case, nitrogen fixation, Cl chemistry, catalysis in petroleum refining (cracking, reforming, alkylation, hydrorefining, etc.), and catalysis by transition metal complexes.

CHE 1141 Advanced Chemical Reaction Engineering

This second-level course in reactor design and analysis focuses upon the following topics: multiphase kinetics and catalysis; simultaneous diffusion and reaction, including an analysis using effectiveness factors and Thiele modulus; analysis of models of complex flow and mixing in reactors; reactor modelling; reactor performance and stability of operation for simple and complex kinetic schemes; design considerations for heterogeneous reactors; industrial and research applications of chemical reactors.

CHE 1142 Applied Chemical Thermodynamics

This course has the objective of reviewing the basic concepts of thermodynamics with specific applications to processes involving phase equilibrium or equilibrium in chemical reactions. The course is divided in three parts. In the first part we will review the laws of thermodynamics, and the thermodynamic properties and phase behavior of pure substances. In the second part we will review the thermodynamic properties in mixtures and multiphase equilibria in non-reactive systems. In the last part of the course we will review the energy balance and equilibrium in chemical reactions. The evaluation will consist of a midterm at the end of the review section, and a final exam that will evaluate the last two parts of the course. This course also involves a term project where the student uses some of these concepts in a specific example related to his/her thesis project.

CHE 1143 Transport Phenomena

Momentum, heat and mass transfer. General balances: continuity, species continuity, energy, and linear momentum equations. Rate expressions: Newton´s law of viscosity, Fourier´s law of conduction, and Fick´s law of diffusion. Applications to multi-dimensional problems, convective transport, transport in turbulent flow, interphase transport, boundary layer theory. Discussion of transport analogies.

CHE 1213 Corrosion

The following topics amongst others, are treated: the various types and forms of corrosion, electrochemical theories of corrosion, corrosion testing methods, corrosion behaviour of iron, steel, and other common engineering metals, corrosion of steel and aluminum in reinforced concrete, passivity, atmospheric corrosion, underground corrosion, seawater corrosion, effects of stress, corrosion in the chemical process industries, the use of Pourbaix diagrams and methods of corrosion protection and control (selection of materials, coatings, corrosion inhibitors, cathodic protection, anodic protection). A number of problems (with worked solutions) are provided to clarify the concepts.

CHE 1541 Two-Phase Flow and Heat Transfer

This course covers the following topics: introduction to two-phase flow, basic definitions, flow regime, void fraction and pressure drop, homogeneous and two-fluid modelling, pool and flow boiling heat transfer, critical heat flux, rewetting and post dryout heat transfer, countercurrent flow limitation and some selected problems encountered in various industries.

CHE 2504 Industrial Pollution Prevention

A brief review of treatment technologies for air, surface and ground water, soils and solid wastes, and an account of more advanced technologies. Description of methods of analysing and monitoring contaminants and assessing their dispersal in local environments. Compliance with environmental regulations. Selected examples of “pollution prevention”; approaches to process change to avoid environmental problems.

CHE 553 Electrochemistry

This course has been designed to provide the student with a working knowledge of the subject area. The topics dealt with include, among others, the physical chemistry of electrolyte solutions, ion transport in solution, ionic conductivity, electrode equilibrium, reference electrodes, electrode kinetics, heat effects in cells, electrochemical energy conversion (fuel cells and secondary batteries), and industrial electrochemical processes. Numerous problems (with worked solutions) are provided to clarify the concepts.

CHE 568 Nuclear Engineering

Fundamental and applied aspects of nuclear engineering. The structure of the nucleus; nuclear stability and radioactive decay; the interaction of radiation with matter including radiological health hazards; the interaction of neutrons including cross-sections, flux, moderation, fission, neutron diffusion and criticality. Poison buildup and their effects on criticality. Nuclear engineering of reactors, reactor accidents, and safety issues.

CHE1149 Electrolyte Thermodynamics

Thermodynamics of electrolyte solutions including ionic equilibrium, activity models, complexation, speciation, and solubility. Computer-aided modelling of complex multicomponent electrolyte systems. Construction of speciation, solubility, and electrochemical stability diagrams in both dilute and concentrated solutions. Methods of extrapolation to elevated temperatures. Applications to inorganic processing, environmental, nuclear, pulp and paper, bioprocess engineering. Students engage in computational projects relating to their Thesis projects.


AER courses

AER 0507 Introduction to Fusion Energy

Nuclear reactions between light elements provide the energy source for the sun and stars. On earth, such reactions could form the basis of an essentially inexhaustible energy resource. In order for the fusion reactions to proceed at a rate suitable for the generation of electricity, the fuels (usually hydrogen) must be heated to temperatures near 100 million Kelvin. At these temperatures, the fuel will exist in the plasma state. This course will cover: (i) the basic physics of fusion, including reaction cross-sections, particle energy distribution, Lawson criterion and radiation balance, (ii) plasma properties including plasma waves, plasma transport, heating and stability, and (iii) magnetic confinement methods. Topics will be related to current experimental research in the field.

AER 0510 Aerospace Propulsion

Scope and history of jet and rocket propulsion; fundamentals of air-breathing and rocket propulsion; fluid mechanics and thermodynamics of propulsion including boundary layer mechanics and combustion; principles of aircraft jet engines, engine components and performance; principles of rocket propulsion, rocket performance, and chemical rockets; environmental impact of aircraft jet engines.

AER 1301 Kinetic Theory of Gases

Introductory discussion of significant length dimensions; different flow regimes, continuum, transition, collision-free; and a brief history of gas kinetic theory. Equilibrium kinetic theory; the article distribution function; Maxell-Boltzmann distribution. Collision dynamics; collision frequency and mean free path. Elementary transport theory, transport coefficients, mean free path method. Boltzmann equation; derivation, Boltzmann H-theorem, collision operators. Generalized transport theory; Maxwell´s equations of change; approximate solution techniques, Chapman -Ensog perturbative and Grad series expansion methods, moment closures; derivation of the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations, higher-order closures. Free molecular aerodynamics. Shock waves.

AER 1304 Fundamentals of Combustion

This course starts with a review of chemical thermodynamics, statistical mechanics, equilibrium chemistry, chemical kinetics, and conservation equations. Then, the following subjects are covered: chemical and dynamic structure of laminar premixed, diffusion, and partially premixed flames; turbulent premixed combustion; turbulent diffusive combustion in one and two-phase flows; aerodynamics and stabilization of flames; ignition, extinction and combustion instabilities; non-intrusive combustion diagnostics and flame spectroscopy.

AER 1306 Special Topics in Reacting Flows

This course provides the students who are intending a career in combustion/reacting flows, fluid mechanics or propulsion an opportunity to do an in-depth study of some of the current academic research areas with implications of practical importance. It will also be suitable for graduate students who have a good background in essentials of their research area, but need a specialized course to cover material not available in other graduate courses. Intention is not to replace or to overlap with the literature review of the students theses work. The course will cover 3 to 4 topics from the following: non-intrusive experimental techniques in isothermal and reacting flows; activation energy asymptotics; high-speed combustion; metal combustion in propulsion; thermo-acoustics in propulsion systems; soot formation and oxidation kinetics; theory of partially-premixed turbulent combustion; synthesis of nano-materials by combustion; high-pressure combustion. Topic selection will depend on the interests of the students taking the course. Similar topics will be added as needed.

AER 1320 Air-Breathing Propulsion

Ramjets and Scramjets. Aerothermodynamics of supersonic inlets, combustion chambers and nozzles. On- and off-design propulsive performance of cruising

AER 1706 Fusion Reactor Systems

The course will consist of five biweekly seminars/meetings at which students will make 10-15 minute presentations, and prepare 3-5 page reports, on one of five topics related to the design of fusion reactors. Proposed Topics are: (i) confinement techniques, (ii) plasma heating methods, (iii) breeding blanket concepts, (iv) plasma diagnostic techniques, and (v) advanced fusion concepts. It is anticipated that some of the topics will change from year to year.

AER 1716 Fusion Reactor Materials

This course is available to students doing research in the field of fusion energy at the doctoral level. The course provides the student an opportunity to do an in-depth study of: (i) a particular material in a fusion context, (ii) a particular material requirement of a fusion reactor, or (iii) a particular physical or chemical mechanism involved in plasma-materials interactions. Past topics have included: liquid lithium as a plasma-facing material, neutron irradiation effects on beryllium and tungsten, implications of an all-tungsten or an all-carbon first wall in a D-T burning reactor, and tritium inventory issues.


MIE Courses

MIE 1120 Current Energy Infrastructure and Resources

This course covers the basic principles of where and how global energy is currently supplied, by primary source. The aim is to provide an energy literacy that can inform research, technology development and effective policy in this area. The course content will be divided strictly according to the current global energy mix (i.e. 34% oil, 29% coal, 23% gas, 7% hydro, 5% Nuclear, 2% Other). In each case background reading and critical analyses will be applied to: (a) the characteristics of the resource; (b) the infrastructure for extraction/development of the resource; (c) the usage of the resulting energy; and (d) the implications for usage. Assignments and exams will assess both background knowledge and the ability to apply fluid flow, thermodynamic and heat transfer analyses to energy supply systems.

MIE 1101 Thermodynamics II

A course in which the postulatory approach is used to develop the theory of thermodynamics. The postulates are stated in terms of a variational principle that allows them to be applied to systems subjected to fields, to phase transitions, and to systems in which surface effects are dominant. The thermodynamic stability of systems is examined and examples of stable, metastable and unstable systems are discussed.

MIE 1128 Materials for Clean Energy Technology

The primary emphasis of the course is materials properties relevant for some clean energy conversion technologies. More specifically, some materials such as inorganic solids and semi-conductors that play key roles in clean electricity production technologies such as fuel cells, gas turbines, and solar cells will be the primary focus, with their ionic and electronic conduction mechanisms and their relevance being the major part of the technical content of the course. That information will be combined with some overview-level information of a few different technologies on a broad level.

MIE1107 Statistical Thermodynamics

Thermodynamics is reviewed. Quantum mechanics is introduced and used to define the possible microscopic states of macroscopic systems. For macroscopic systems in thermodynamic equilibrium, the concept of ensemble averages is introduced and the postulates of statistical mechanics are used to calculate their thermodynamic properties from knowledge of their molecular nature. Entropy is interpreted in terms of quantum mechanical concepts. The thermal properties of solids, of gases adsorbed on solid surfaces, of electrons in solids, of radiation, and of ideal gases are studied.

MIE1123 Fundamentals of Combustion

This course will deal with the basic theory of combustion in the steady state, with consideration of theories of flame propagation, flame stabilization, limits of inflammability, ignition, quenching, etc., and discussion will include both laminar and premixed flames, diffusion flames, flames and detonation.

MIE515 Alternative Energy Systems

This courses covers the basic principles and design of selected alternative energy systems. Systems discussed include solar thermal systems, solar photovoltaic, wind technology, fuel cells, and energy storage.

MIE516H Combustion and Fuels

Introduction to combustion theory. Chemical equilibrium and the products of combustion. Combustion kinetics and types of combustion. Pollutant formation. Design of combustion systems for gaseous, liquid and solid fuels. The use of alternative fuels (hydrogen, biofuels, etc.) and their effect on combustion systems.

MIE517H Fuel Cell Systems

Thermodynamics and electrochemistry of fuel cell operation and testing; understanding of polarization curves and impedance spectroscopy; common fuel cell types, materials, components, and auxiliary systems; high and low temperature fuel cells and their applications in transportation and stationary paower generation, including co-generation and combined heat and power systems; engineering system requirements resulting from basic fuel cell properties and characteristics.


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